Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Excessive love, distorted lives and God

  1. (Definition) x has an infinitely excessive love for y if and only if x loves y and either (a) x loves y as an existent entity and y does not in fact exist or (b) x loves y as being infinitely greater than y in fact is.
  2. (Premise) A life centered on an infinitely excessive love is severely distorted in respect of morally central elements of life.
  3. (Premise) St Francis of Assisi's (or Mother Teresa's or ...) life is not severely distorted in respect of morally central elements of life.
  4. (Premise) St Francis of Assisi's (or Mother Teresa's or ...) life is centered on loving someone as an absolutely infinite being.
  5. (Premise) If God does not exist, then every being that exists is infinitely less than an absolutely infinite being.
  6. St Francis of Assisi's (or Mother Teresa's or ...) love of someone as an absolutely infinite being is not infinitely excessive. (2-4)
  7. If God does not exist, then a love for someone as an absolutely infinite being is infinitely excessive. (1 and 5)
  8. So there is a God. (6 and 7).
Subsidiary argument for (3):
  1. (Premise) St Francis of Assisi's (or Mother Teresa's or ...) life was a greatly flourishing human life.
  2. (Premise) A greatly flourishing human life is not severely distorted in respect of morally central elements of life.
  3. So, etc.

1 comment:

Jonathan Bryan said...

Premise 10 might be false, I say. Here's why:

1. There are atheists who had greatly flourishing human lives.
2. If Christianity is true, then the atheist's life is severely distorted in respect of morally central elements of life (e.g. failure to love God).
3. So, if Christianity is true, it is not the case that "a greatly flourishing human life is not severely distorted in respect of morally central elements of life."
4. Christianity is true.
5. So it is not the case that "a greatly flourishing human life is not severely distorted in respect of morally central elements of life."